Human Prey - Netflix

Sat 29 June 2019

Humans have long been at the top of the food chain, but what happens when the predator becomes prey? Can we survive against animals that are built stronger and faster than us? In an event where animals are guided by sheer killer instinct, mere seconds of ingenuity could make a difference between life and death. Human Prey brings you the amazing stories of those who have been attacked, and how they managed to survive despite the odds. See what happens in situations where humans have to defend themselves against an attack. From Great White sharks to grizzly bears, coyotes to crocodiles, witness incredible tales of those who have narrowly escaped the claws and jaws of death.

Human Prey - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2009-02-25

Human Prey - Bengal tiger - Netflix

The Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is the most numerous tiger subspecies in Asia, and was estimated at fewer than 2,500 individuals by 2011. Since 2008, it is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List and is threatened by poaching, loss and fragmentation of habitat. None of the Tiger Conservation Landscapes within its range is considered large enough to support an effective population of more than 250 adult individuals. The tiger arrived in the Indian subcontinent about 12,000 years ago. India's tiger population was estimated at 1,706–1,909 individuals in 2010. By 2014, the population had reputedly increased to an estimated 2,226 individuals. Around 440 tigers are estimated in Bangladesh, 163–253 tigers in Nepal and 103 tigers in Bhutan. The Bengal tiger ranks among the biggest wild cats alive today. It is therefore considered to belong to the world's charismatic megafauna. It is the national animal of both India and Bangladesh.

Human Prey - Hunting and diet - Netflix

The tiger is a carnivore. It prefers hunting large ungulates such as chital, sambar, gaur, and to a lesser extent also barasingha, water buffalo, nilgai, serow and takin. Among the medium-sized prey species it frequently kills wild boar, and occasionally hog deer, muntjac and grey langur. Small prey species such as porcupine, hares and peafowl form a very small part in its diet. Because of the encroachment of humans into tiger habitat, it also preys on domestic livestock. They rarely attack adult Indian elephant and Indian rhinoceros, but such extraordinarily rare events have been recorded. In Kaziranga National Park, tigers killed 20 rhinoceros in 2007. Results of scat analyses indicate that the tigers in Nagarahole National Park preferred prey weighing more than 176 kg (388 lb) and that on average tiger prey weighed 91.5 kg (202 lb). The prey species included chital, sambar, wild pig and gaur. Gaur remains were found in 44.8% of all tiger scat samples, sambar remains in 28.6%, wild pig remains in 14.3% and chital remains in 10.4% of all scat samples. In Bandipur National Park, gaur and sambar together also constituted 73% of tiger diet. In most cases, tigers approach their victim from the side or behind from as close a distance as possible and grasp the prey's throat to kill it. Then they drag the carcass into cover, occasionally over several hundred meters, to consume it. The nature of the tiger's hunting method and prey availability results in a “feast or famine” feeding style: they often consume 18–40 kilograms (40–88 lb) of meat at one time. If injured, old or weak, or regular prey species are becoming scarce, tigers also attack humans and become man-eaters.

Human Prey - References - Netflix